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Happy Mother’s Day from FedEx Office

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Happy Mother’s Day from FedEx Office

We can never do enough to thank our moms.

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FedEx Office wanted to help our team members say thanks to the exceptional moms, wives and mother figures in their lives this Mother’s Day.

Hundreds of team members from around the country submitted stories about why their moms deserved to be thanked.

That included a VIP shopping experience and $1,000 to spend with their special guest to the famous Magnolia Market in Waco, TX.

Our team members at our onsite shipping station helped get their purchases packed up and shipped home safely.

Afterwards they enjoyed a behind-the-scenes tour of the market, games and relaxing on the lawn, and delicious group lunch underneath the silos.

Happy Mother’s Day to all the moms out there from FedEx Office.

Jenn and her mother-in-law, Cyndi
Center Manager, Beaverton, OR

I did not meet my real mother until I was 14. When I was six months old, she left. I spent my childhood putting her on a pedestal.

Once I was 14, I searched for my mother and found her. I flew to New York to meet her. Within weeks, it was clear to me that my mother was not the person I dreamed her to be. I was absolutely crushed.

When I was in first grade, my father remarried. Within a few years, my stepmother gave my father an ultimatum: I go or she goes. He chose her and sent me to live with my aunt and uncle. When I was 17, my beloved aunt lost her battle to breast cancer. Once again, I felt abandoned.

When I was 21, I met the love of my life: my husband, Rex. He had this amazing relationship with his mother and it was something I had always longed for.

My husband’s mother, Cyndi, and I hit it off from first contact. We have a connection that goes way beyond mother and daughter-in-law. She has extended to me that wing of protection and unconditional love that I never had with either of my parents. My husband is the first born of four boys. All of them have grown to be successful and I really attribute that to Cyndi’s generous, gentle, compassionate nature. She is the strongest woman I have met to date. She has struggled with many things in life but doesn’t let anything or anyone knock her down.

Cyndi makes me feel like I am important and worthy of love. Every day I aspire to be the mother to my children that she is to us. She is caring and kind and supportive and never passes judgment. She is my mom, my confidant and my best friend. I would not be where I am today without my momma bear. She is by far one of the most important figures in my life and she deserves all the best things the world has to offer.

Lynn and her mom, Diane
Executive Assistant, Plano, TX

My mom, “Grandma Diane,” was born in 1934. The Depression years, the loss of her sister to polio and the loss of her youth to raising a family did not stop her from becoming a strong, loving and giving mother!

At the age of 19, she married my father, Rich, who adored children and wanted to have many sons to help work the farmland. Well, they ended up having six girls! That didn’t stop Dad from having us work the farmland and family business.

It was not an easy life for Diane, raising six girls on a very low income. She was the perfect mother, housekeeper, cook and bottle washer. Imagine washing glass bottles and cloth diapers, for SIX! She kept our house spotless and our clothes clean. Every evening before my Dad came home, she put on a dress, nylons and high heels. Her hair and makeup would be perfect, and dinner for eight was on the table.

We lost my Dad to cancer in 1982, and my Mom has been on her own since. She keeps our house just as clean as she did when we were growing up in her house. She still fixes our dinners, washes our clothes, and puts up with our crazy schedules.

She is now almost 83 years old, with the energy of a six-year-old. She has six daughters, 14 grandchildre, and 20 great-grandchildren, and she keeps up with all of our names and birthdays!

She is proud of me and what I do for FedEx Office, and she brags every day to anyone who will listen.

Why does she deserve this honor? Her favorite thing in life, other than all of her kids, is Chip and Joanna Gaines and Magnolia Market. It would be one of the very best presents I could ever give to her if she were to win this prize. I could finally give my mom something that she gave to all six of us girls – our love for life, our love for beautiful people and our love for beautiful handmade things.

Mom…I’m proud of you, proud of where we came from and how we were raised, and proud you are now a Texan!

With love from your FedEx Office daughter, Lynn

Megan and her mom, Kim
Assistant Center Manager, Cary, NC

My mom is an amazing woman. She raised my brother and me as a single parent, but she was never really alone in the adventure. She built herself a village of friends and family to ensure we were surrounded by love, passion and opportunity. She had many “rules” – we had to take up a musical instrument, we had to play a sport and we had to be involved in an extra-curricular academic activity. These things were a burden for her financially and socially, but it was incredibly important that we experience the world with knowledge and preparation. She taught us that working hard and sacrificing a little for those you love is important.

When I was a junior in high school, my mom was diagnosed with an eye disease that would leave her blind. There was not a lot of information available about the disease and no timeline for how long her sight would last. Rather than despair, my mom decided that she was going to fight. She joined a clinical trial and subjected herself to some very invasive eye treatments. There was some recovery, but by the time I graduated high school, she was legally blind. Again, my mom rolled up her sleeves and learned how to advocate for herself. She decided that she was going to move to Savannah, Georgia, because she had always wanted to live there and she was going to do it before she couldn’t appreciate its visual beauty.

Less than two months from being told she could no longer drive, she moved halfway across the country, by herself, to a city she had never been to before. I was in college at the time on a scholarship and worried that I couldn’t be there for my mom. But she proved that determination is a strength that allows you to overcome any adversity.

My mom now works tirelessly to advocate for visually impaired people and spends time still making sure that my brother and I follow her rules. And by following her rules, I have met and built my own village. I work hard every day to ensure those I love have opportunities to grow and experience the world for all of its beauty.

Sarah and her wife, Sarah Lynn
Center Manager, Mayfield Heights, OH

In Bangor, Maine, Sarah Lynn first became a mother. It was her 32nd week of pregnancy, and Loring Air Force Hospital was Ill-equipped to handle her high-risk pregnancy. The staff loaded her into an Air Force cargo plane to get her the help she needed in Maine. On July 25, 1995, she gave birth to beautiful twin daughters. Two years later at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, Sarah met her third daughter.

Sarah is unflappable. She recounts incidents that would panic any mother with less fortitude. ER runs. Lice. Illnesses. Being stuck on the highway with three kids under three years of age in the middle of a snowstorm 339 miles from home. I try to picture how I would handle any of these situations with my own children. You see, I am also a mother to three daughters. I listen and try to learn from everything Sarah tells me. She is my hero and I will tell you why.

In addition to raising three girls, Sarah Lynn has spent the past 16 years caring for the elderly in an Alzheimer’s unit. Her patience and kindness knows no bounds. She says, “I only treat them how I know I would like to be treated in my last days.”

In June 2010, Sarah and I met and became fast friends. She supported me through the toughest time in my life as I became a single mom. She became a second mother to my three girls without hesitation. She let them know that there would always be love and support for them. This is something for which I can never repay her.

Six years ago, I lost my job. Sarah picked up a second job to keep us on our feet while I looked for other employment. This is something for which I can never repay her.

When I was lucky enough to land a job with FedEx Office, Sarah made sure my children were fed, clothes were clean, homework was done, rides were arranged, and the house was always immaculate when I got home. For these things, I could never repay her.

Sarah stood by me when my mother passed away after a long battle with cancer. She taught me how to navigate life in the midst of heartbreak. For that, I can never repay her.

The adventures I have shared with Sarah are too many to list. She is spontaneous, intrepid and brave beyond words. She models the independent, confident, carefree persona that I wish so very much for my girls to be. You guessed it! I can never repay her for that.

I married Sarah Lynn on Oct. 29, 2016. I made a solemn vow to love and care for her for the rest of my life. I can only hope it’s a good start toward repaying her for all she has done.

LaSondra and her mom, Tammy
Center Consultant, Austin, TX

Growing up, the question “when were you adopted?” became a normal one for me. But my answer is “I wasn’t.” I am a Jamaican-American bi-racial woman whose skin shows no evidence of my biological white mother. Her love for my dad, my brother and I caused her to be exiled from her family. When I look back and reflect on how I was raised, I realize that my mom lived by the motto “let the kids be kids” and preserved our innocence. She never talked ill of the family members who took years to grow beyond their prejudice and let us into their homes – and, eventually, their hearts. My mom forgave them without bitterness so my brother and I could enjoy our extended family. I only know of the estranged period because those family members apologized to me. My mom truly forgave and forgot.

Despite all of the emotional turmoil, my mom was determined to raise emotionally healthy and confident children. She always told me I could be anything I wanted to be, and she encouraged my adventurous spirit. She climbed with me on roofs to hang Christmas lights and rejoined me even after falling off. She rode jet skis with me in the ocean alongside dolphins. She zip lined with me in Costa Rica and got her sunglasses stolen by monkeys. She rode ATV’s with me in the rain forest. She hiked with me in the Sequoia National Park and stood face-to-face with a bear. Today, with a bad hip and torn meniscus, my mother is training so she can join me on a 500-mile walk known as the Camino de Santiago.

Knowing she sheltered me from growing up, I shouldn’t have been surprised to learn that she is scared of basically everything I got her involved in: roller coasters, heights, the ocean and bears, not to mention all the other stories I’ve left out. When I look back on my childhood, I can truly say I was never alone. My mom was right by my side, not only cheering me on but joining in, all while I was ebullient and she terrified. What a great love I’ve been so lucky to experience.

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